It is not easy to raise concerns with a loved one over mental capacity issues.  Whilst we may joke about 'losing our marbles', likelihood is any serious suggestion that a loved one might be suffering from mental capacity issues will be greeted with disdain, despite us become increasingly aware of mentally debilitating diseases.

However, whilst we might automatically jump to an assumption that a memory issue  means dementia, in fact there might be other  conditions that an individual is suffering from that could be the cause.

If a person hasn't seen a GP for a while,  (and  pride themselves on this fact), it might be worth suggesting that an 'MOT' with the Doctor would be worthwhile.  This appointment could be used to express concerns and provide examples of the behaviour which has been noted which will assist the GP in deciding whether further investigation is required.

If a diagnosis of Alzheimer's or Dementia is made, then the next difficult conversation regarding Lasting Powers of Attorney should be addressed.  It is of course sensible to put in place plans for the management of your affairs in the event of mental incapacity whilst you retain the capacity to do so, as the default position of a Deputyship Order might not provide the outcome you would have planned for given the choice.